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Fayetteville & Newnan Build for the Future

    Coweta and Fayette counties have long been considered excellent places to live. Both counties offer above average schools, access to quality healthcare, excellent parks, and other amenties that draw people to want to live here. The strong economic base in both counties is what makes all of this possible.

    The groundwork was laid years ago, back in 1822 when Fayetteville was founded and became a trading town for the farming folks in the surrounding land. Just a few years later Newnan was founded with merchants, lawyers and other professionals at it’s center. Several decades later Senoia and Sharpsburg came into existence. Much, much, later Peachtree City was founded in 1959.  

    Without the power of trade and business, none of our cities and towns would exist. The challenge is to grow in a manner that is planned, positive, and sustainable. There are cities throughout the north side of Atlanta that exemplify growth without a plan, filled with concrete and congestion. In recent years both Coweta and Fayette county have realized that if they didn’t start planning for their growth they would end up with the same problems.

    When Fayetteville began their revitalization plan almost a decade ago, part of the plan was to develop and enhance the downtown area to be walkable, which would reduce daily traffic. Understandably, residents might still have to drive to work. But if they are able to walk to dinner or for local entertainment, the amount of people on the roads is still reduced.

    A big piece of that “walkable” plan is coming to fruition with the opening of Walton Fayetteville, an apartment community bordering Triumph Station and City Center Park. Opened in early 2023, the smoke-free community of Walton Fayetteville is only a few steps from the boutiques and eateries of downtown Fayetteville. In addition to being convenient to downtown Fayetteville, it will offer open floor designs, stainless steel appliances, smart home technologies one, two and three room floorplans.

    Another addition that is coming to downtown Fayetteville is the opening of 240 Glynn Street – a transformation of the former City Hall into a dynamic dining and creative space in downtown Fayetteville. The existing space will be enhanced and restored and new businesses will open there. It will feature Rooted Cafe, a coffee and roasting cafe, Grazefull and Cured charcuterie concept, The Hummingbird Wine Bar and Market, Two Hands Pottery Studio, Sparrow Boutique and Salon, and a 2200 square foot event space.

    In fall of this year construction will begin on the data center that will be housed between Trilith and Tyrone. It will significantly increase the tax revenue for the City of Fayetteville, as well as encourage other tech related business to locate in the area. The future looks bright for Fayetteville and they have more projects planned for the future.

Newnan is also looking to the future as they reinvigorate their downtown area. Main Street Newnan works and Newnan Economic Development both work towards making Newnan a great place to live, work, and play.​

Main Street Newnan plays a vital role in success of businesses in the downtown area. Their impact is based on a specific plan. As an accredited National and Georgia Main Street Program, they are dedicated to community revitalization based on historic preservation. By incorporating the Main Street Four Point Approach, which is composed of focus on Economic Vitality, Design, Organization, and Promotion, they work to keep downtown Newnan thriving and growing.

Throughout the year unique marketing strategies and special events continually promote the downtown area and bring vistors to shop, dine and spend time. They also strive to support efforts to continually improve the aestheic environment of the histoirc buildings that make up the downtown area. The coordination of efforts, commitments, and leadership that advance the Main Street program, as well as the use of strategic planning to support the financial restructuring of our historic business area are also part of their plan. By doing so they help provide the city the best chance to effectively boost the commercial downtown by using partnerships, our culture, small companies, local assets, architectural heritage, and community activities to encourage local businesses and civic pride.

Since 1986, Main Street Newnan, one of Georgia’s oldest Main Street programs, has acted as a point of contact for the City of Newnan with the corporate community, local and regional economic development organizations, and the non-profit sector. The Main Street Program was established 35 years ago by a collection of neighborhood volunteers, companies, and collaborating organizations who dedicated many hours of their free time and money to ensuring the future of our downtown.

Their dedication to preserving our city’s cultural character through the revitalization of our downtown area served as a model that will help our program continue to advance in the future. Strategic relationships are necessary to maintain a successful redevelopment effort, as Main Street Newnan is aware. They continue to grow and strengthen the support that has been given by the community as a result of the expansion that Downtown Newnan has experienced.

As has been the pattern for several years of growth, Main Street Newnan hopes to see an increase in the number of new program sponsors. The continuation of collaboration with new companies and groups while seeing a rise in the number of people volunteering will enable the downtown area to continue to thrive.

Another way Main Street Newnan encourages visitors to come to Newnan to shop and dine is through planned events throughout the year.

From March to December, the first Saturday of each month around the courthouse square in downtown Newnan is when Main Street Newnan hosts the Monthly Market Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The market features a range of locally produced goods that have been crafted by farmers, artists, and artisans in the area.

Twice a year, downtown Newnan comes alive for the Art Walk Event, which is our celebration of regional art. Businesses stay open later during the Art Walk to feature exhibits and demos in-store that have been carefully curated by some of Newnan’s best artists. At least 40 artists display their work throughout downtown, with a wide range of artistic techniques and media represented, such as oil on canvas, engraving, pottery, photography, jewelry-making, fiber arts, performing arts, and acrylics.

Summer NewnaNights, a 4th of July Parade, Labor Day Sidewalk Sale, Sunrise on the Square Race, Spirits & Spice, and Plaid Friday are just a few of the other planned events throughout the year.

One of the programs that they have instituted is Placemaking, Creating a sense of place can involve anything from putting garbage cans on the sidewalk to creating an innovation district where the locals can meet. Wadsworth Alley is one of the successful Placemaking projects in downtown Newnan. All placemaking initiatives, however, share one goal in common: strengthening local communities.

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NEWNAN–COWETA CHAMBER UPDATE

Q&A Answers by Candace Boothby, President & CEO; Susan Kraut, Vice-President.

1. What Chamber program/development do you consider the most impactful during 2022?

    Year after year, it becomes increasingly challenging to identify just one program as the most impactful, as the hallmark of the NCC is to innovate and invigorate. A 5-Star Accredited Chamber and National Chamber of the Year, the bar is high when considering both value AND impact.

    However, 2022 marked an incredible year for members representing several business sectors. We redeveloped and added to an already thoughtful roster of alliances, representing means by which members could further engage with the leadership and peers. The Non-Profit Alliance, for example, was reimagined with a mission to foster partnerships between the non- and for-profit business sectors to further enhance the quality of life for the greater Coweta community.

    A significant output of this alliance is Friendsgiving, an annual pot-luck-style luncheon devised and organized by non-profit members to recognize the generosity of for-profit partners. One of the most popular Chamber offerings, the alliance welcomed over 125 guests and featured more than a dozen entrees and sides donated by local food service providers, including Meals on Wheels, Newks, Nothing Bundt Cakes, Kool Beans, Life of the South Catering, and more.

Additional added or redeveloped offerings include the Small Business Alliance, the Coweta Impact Alliance, the Talent Development Alliance, and several others. More information is found on our website at newnancowetachamber.org or through a quick phone call to 770.253.2270.

2. What Chamber program/development are you most excited about in 2023?

    In mid-2022, Coweta County received the second installment of more than $28 million in American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) funds and established a committee to review applications for 501(c)(3) and 501(c)(6) organizations to receive funding as sub-recipients.

    The Newnan-Coweta Chamber was approved for two projects. Other awardees include Meals on Wheels of Coweta, the Pathways Center, the Coweta Community Foundation, and One Roof Ecumenical Outreach. The county commissioners unanimously approved the sub-awards at the September 20 meeting. Commissioner Tim Lassetter, who motioned to approve the grants, thanked the non-profits for all they do for the community.

Small Business Digital Aid Program

    The Chamber will implement a small business digital aid program that will enable Coweta businesses to improve digital capabilities. Coweta businesses that need a better website, a less clunky online store, or a more streamlined experience for internet customers can apply for digital aid through the Chamber’s program, beginning in early-mid 2023.

    The technology project is a partnership between the Chamber and the University of Georgia Small Business Development Center. The program will offer between $2,400 to $18,000 to businesses with less than 25 full-time employees. All companies must hold an active business license in Coweta County.

    Through this program, the Chamber expects to create a capacity for between twenty and forty Coweta-based businesses to establish, increase, and/or market their digital presence to benefit their bottom line and continued operations.

Career Readiness Training Program

    The second program, funded through ARPA dollars, aims at Coweta’s un-and underemployed workforce. The Career Readiness training program, a partnership between the Chamber, West Georgia Technical College, and the Georgia Tech Innovation Institute, will offer soft skills training, including approximately 40 hours of instruction representing roughly 24 hours of soft skills education and eight hours of customized interactive simulations via the Buzz Electronicsprogram. There will also be instruction in workplace safety, business acumen, basic math and measurement refreshers, and forklift operator safety training.

    The Chamber aims to have a pilot program in place in the spring of 2023, with full implementation in the fall; participants must be Coweta residents who are unemployed or underemployed due to the pandemic; enrollment is free. Ultimately, the Chamber aspires to make the program permanent and expand it for students and the incumbent workforce.

Great Communities Begin with Great Conversation

    Much of Coweta’s secret sauce can be found in its ability of community leaders to work collaboratively.  Building on this culture, the Chamber plans to host a quality-of-life growth summit on August 30.  This event will launch a series of conversations focused on topics faced by fast-growing communities, i.e., housing, transportation, and talent development.  The goal of this initiative is to help build an informed community that is engaged in meaningful civic conversations. Local leaders and influencers from different sectors will discuss the importance of investing in our community and the need for an intentional mindset as we grow.  The launch event will feature high-profile keynote speakers sharing community success stories in other communities.

FAYETTE CHAMBER UPDATE

Fayetteville Chamber Q&A Answers by Colin Martin, President

1. What Chamber program/development do you consider the most impactful during 2022?

    We are very proud that we hosted our fourth annual Diversity & Inclusion Summit in August of 2022. Our theme was “What Does Inclusion Look Like?” We hear so much about the topic of diversity and inclusion so we wanted our attendees to learn strategies and tactics that they could implement immediately to create a more inclusive environment. We not only focused on race but on disability, veteran status, and gender. Fayette County is already a diverse community. We now need to make everyone feel included.

    We were also proud to host Gov. Brian Kemp for the second time in four years at the chamber. He gave an “state of the state” address and answered many questions from our members. To have a sitting governor visit Fayette County twice in one term demonstrates the importance of the Fayette business community in our state. We have been fortunate to have many statewide elected and appointed officials come to our chamber and we look forward to that continuing

2. What Chamber program/development are you most excited about in 2023?

    We are hosting our first sporting clays tournament in late March. We always try to find new ways for our members to connect and build relationships. We think this event will bring members who would not normally attend our golf tournament come together for fun and fellowship. Last year we added a corn hole tournament that was very successful and brought many new people together. We think the sporting clays tournament will do the same.

    We are also working to improve our engagement with our members. Our social media campaign, #ColinConnects, is designed for me to meet as many of our members as possible and I get the opportunity to promote their businesses while promoting their engagement. So far, this has been a huge success/

3. How is the development in downtown Fayetteville impacting local businesses?

    The development of City Center Park has really brought a focal point for people to gather in Fayetteville. It is crowded just about every weekend. Line Creek Brewery is very popular and the other businesses are benefiting. As the Walton Community finishes up and people move in, I think you will see that area thrive. I am very excited about what the City of Fayetteville has done.

​    Main Street Newnan plays a vital role in success of businesses in the downtown area. Their impact is based on a specific plan. As an accredited National and Georgia Main Street Program, they are dedicated to community revitalization based on historic preservation. By incorporating the Main Street Four Point Approach, which is composed of focus on Economic Vitality, Design, Organization, and Promotion, they work to keep downtown Newnan thriving and growing.

    Throughout the year unique marketing strategies and special events continually promote the downtown area and bring vistors to shop, dine and spend time. They also strive to support efforts to continually improve the aestheic environment of the historic buildings that make up the downtown area. The coordination of efforts, commitments, and leadership that advance the Main Street program, as well as the use of strategic planning to support the financial restructuring of our historic business area are also part of their plan. By doing so they help provide the city the best chance to effectively boost the commercial downtown by using partnerships, our culture, small companies, local assets, architectural heritage, and community activities to encourage local businesses and civic pride.

    Since 1986, Main Street Newnan, one of Georgia’s oldest Main Street programs, has acted as a point of contact for the City of Newnan with the corporate community, local and regional economic development organizations, and the non-profit sector. The Main Street Program was established 35 years ago by a collection of neighborhood volunteers, companies, and collaborating organizations who dedicated many hours of their free time and money to ensuring the future of our downtown.

    Their dedication to preserving our city’s cultural character through the revitalization of our downtown area served as a model that will help our program continue to advance in the future. Strategic relationships are necessary to maintain a successful redevelopment effort, as Main Street Newnan is aware. They continue to grow and strengthen the support that has been given by the community as a result of the expansion that Downtown Newnan has experienced.

    As has been the pattern for several years of growth, Main Street Newnan hopes to see an increase in the number of new program sponsors. The continuation of collaboration with new companies and groups while seeing a rise in the number of people volunteering will enable the downtown area to continue to thrive.

    Another way Main Street Newnan encourages visitors to come to Newnan to shop and dine is through planned events throughout the year.

From March to December, the first Saturday of each month around the courthouse square in downtown Newnan is when Main Street Newnan hosts the Monthly Market Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The market features a range of locally produced goods that have been crafted by farmers, artists, and artisans in the area.

    Twice a year, downtown Newnan comes alive for the Art Walk Event, which is our celebration of regional art. Businesses stay open later during the Art Walk to feature exhibits and demos in-store that have been carefully curated by some of Newnan’s best artists. At least 40 artists display their work throughout downtown, with a wide range of artistic techniques and media represented, such as oil on canvas, engraving, pottery, photography, jewelry-making, fiber arts, performing arts, and acrylics.

    Summer NewnaNights, a 4th of July Parade, Labor Day Sidewalk Sale, Sunrise on the Square Race, Spirits & Spice, and Plaid Friday are just a few of the other planned events throughout the year.

One of the programs that they have instituted is Placemaking, Creating a sense of place can involve anything from putting garbage cans on the sidewalk to creating an innovation district where the locals can meet. Wadsworth Alley is one of the successful Placemaking projects in downtown Newnan. All placemaking initiatives, however, share one goal in common: strengthening local communities.

Business Development​​​ & Support

 

COWETA

Coweta County Convention & Visitors Bureau

200 Court Square, Newnan 30263

770-254-2627; explorecoweta.com

​Coweta County Development Authority

100 International Park; Newnan 30265

770-304-1777; developcoweta.com

Main Street Newnan

6 First Avenue, Newnan 30263

770-253-8283; mainstreetnewnan.com

Newnan-Coweta Chamber of Commerce

23 Bullsboro Drive, Newnan 30263

770-253-2270; newnancowetachamber.org

Senoia Downtown Development Authority

April Anderson; 770-880-3766

P. O. Box 310, Senoia 30276

enjoysenoia.com


Senoia Welcome Center

68 Main Street, Senoia 30276

770-727-9173
 

FAYETTE

Fayette County Chamber of Commerce

600 W Lanier Avenue, Ste 205,

Fayetteville 30214  770-461-9983;

fayettechamber.org​

Fayette County Development Authority

200 Courthouse Square, Fayetteville 30214

770-461-5253; fayettega.org


Main Street Fayetteville/DDA

200 Courthouse Sq. Fayetteville 30214

770-719-4173; fayetteville-ga.gov


Peachtree City Convention & Visitors Bureau

191 McIntosh Trail, Peachtree City 30269

678-216-0282; visitpeachtreecity.com

 

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